winterising

I’ve decided to park the van up for the winter and use the Landy. The van will be parked on my drive, I’ve bought myself a cover and dissconnected the battery. I will also try and run the engine for 20 mins every weekend.

Is there anything else I should think about doing, she will probably be parked up untill the spring.

cheers

Try to move it once in a while so the tyres dont flat spot, could up the pressure a bit too.

Handbrake off and roll it back and forth just to make sure.
My camper is sitting in the back garden with a houshold de-humidifier inside it, needs emptying occasionally though.
You should do an oil change as well.

Thanks guys,

I bought one of those silica gel type dehumidifiers from B&Q the other day, I’ll stick that in to keep the damp inside down. I’ve also removed all the curtains and bedding.

I wasn’t aware of condensation build up in the engine before, I’m told it’s better to leave the engine and just turn it over by hand rather than run it up for a short period each week. I changed the oil just before I stopped driving it but have been running the engine every week for about 20 mins as I thought that was the best thing to do. Do you think it would be wise to take the van out for a good long run then change the oil again before finally parking it for the winter?

How exactly is condensation formed when the engine is run for a short period? I guess old oil contains more moisture than fresh oil, hence the need for an oil change.

Thanks again.

Mat

The condensation inside the engine is largely caused by the combustion process:

2 C H + 25 O --> 16 CO + 18 H O
8_18____2________2______2_ :think

All dem molecules of water condense inside your motor and exhaust system as it cools. Obviously, the warmer your engine before shutdown, the greater the chance of this vapour dissipating to the atmosphere before it condenses. However, it wouldny make that much difference given the freezing fog type of weather we’re getting just now.
The ambient dampness of a Scottish winter just sucks the life out of vintage metal… :huh:
And as for road gritters and salt…? :axe

Thanks Alex,

I know what you mean about the Scottish weather, I’ve been up here for 10 years now and I still can’t get used to your winters. Probably something to do with being a soft southerner :smiley: . Still you get the best summers up here, all those long evenings for working on your motor.

The salt is the main reason I’ve taken the van off the road. As you know I shipped the van over from Oz and it’s fairly solid underneath, I want to keep it that way!

With regards to moisture in the engine, I’ve just seen an engine lay up kit for sale by Frosts. It consists of special plugs that you install in place of the spark plugs, using silica gel to keep the chambers dry. Not sure if it’s a bit over the top but it might be worth a try. What do you think? Anybody used one of these before?

cheers

Mat

keith - 2005-12-08 12:27 PM

Try to move it once in a while so the tyres dont flat spot, could up the pressure a bit too.

I’m not sure I believe this flat spotting business. I’ve had a Bus sitting on less than plump tyres for 8 years and the tyres didn’t flat spot - in fact, they passed an MoT without any probs. Maybe cheaper tyres will flat spot but I’m sure I got a bargain all those years ago.

Definitely make sure your handbrake is off, though, 'cause that’ll sieze in a couple of days, far less a few months.

matr - 2005-12-09 8:09 AM
With regards to moisture in the engine, I’ve just seen an engine lay up kit for sale by Frosts. It consists of special plugs that you install in place of the spark plugs, using silica gel to keep the chambers dry. Not sure if it’s a bit over the top but it might be worth a try. What do you think?

I think it probably is a bit OTT - after all, VW’s are kinda famous for being left unattended for YEARS and still firing up first time! Well, maybe that’s in drier climates right enough, but in the days before ‘Historic’ tax discs, I used to lay my van up in an unavoidably damp garage for six months, and the first cranks of spring usually produced life just before the battery died!
Watch the weather forecasts, and give your engine one good long, fast blast along the by-pass, when it’s dry, after some fresh rain has washed the muck off the roads - even if it’s 4am (well, you might just feel like it anyway!) and leave well alone til the daffodils appear… :wink:

Thanks for all the advice guys,

I am in need of 4 new tyres anyway so I won’t worry too much about getting flat spots.

I think I’ve managed to seal up the leaks from the side windows with mastic so the inside should stay dry, the rubbers will need replacing next summer. What started off as a little investigation into where all the water was going that had found it’s way into my van has resulted in me completeyly ripping out the entire interior :lol: .

The furniture was made of that nasty laminated chipboard, seemed to soak the water up like a sponge. Oh well at least it gives me a project for the winter!!

my parents bought me a cover for my beetle…very thoughtful of them.
my question is. i have just got back and the car is covered in frost after last night’s weather. should i wait until there is a thaw and the car is not frosty anymore before i put the cover on or should i just go ahead and do it now?
cheers and happy festives!

Ideally wait until the car is totally dry. Another day or two exposed to the air will not destroy your bug, but trapping moisture under a cover won’t do it any good at all.

To help with condensation in the engine my mate drains the petrol from his bike then pours in some redex and runs it til it stops so that everything has a coating which should last the winter. Bit smokey when you start it up in the spring but that soon disappears.